Do you set unrealistically high expectations for yourself and others? Are you goal-driven, always busy, and have a hard time relaxing? Do you avoid making mistakes? And when you do, do you dwell on them? If so, you may be a perfectionist. Underneath perfectionism is a desire for approval and to connect. Yet, perfectionists often find themselves disconnected from their values and fearing other’s judgment. In this episode, Diana interviews Sharon Martin, LCSW, an expert on perfectionism, about the underpinnings of perfectionism and CBT strategies to let go of your self-critic and find more balance.

Listen and Learn:

  • the key signs of perfectionism
  • how and why perfectionism develops
  • the dark side of perfectionism
  • strategies to unhook from and challenge perfectionism thinking
  • CBT techniques to change perfectionistic patterns

Resources:

About Sharon Martin, LCSW:

Sharon Martin, LCSW is a licensed psychotherapist and codependency expert practicing in San Jose, CA. She specializes in helping perfectionists and people-pleasers embrace their imperfections and overcome self-doubt and shame. Her own struggle to feel “good enough”, inspired her passion for helping others learn to accept and love themselves. Sharon writes the popular blog Happily Imperfect for PsychCentral.com and is the author of the book The CBT Workbook for Perfectionism.


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Please note the information on Psychologists Off The Clock is intended for informational purposes only. It should not be used as a substitute for psychological or medical care. If you are looking for professional help, visit our resources page for guidance on how to find a therapist. If you are experiencing a mental health emergency, call 9-1-1.